40 years of

40 years of

40 years of

40 years of

Old Riverside Foundation

Old Riverside Foundation

Find out more

Find out more

Find out more

Find out more

Discover more about  Old Riverside Foundation

Check out whats new at

Old Riverside Foundation
Recent Blog Posts

Published
Holiday At the Weber

Ruth West

Posted by:

HOLIDAYS AT THE WEBER'S! HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE 2018HOSTED BY THE OLD RIVERSIDE FOUNDATIONBRING A FRIEND WHO HAS NEVERSEEN THE WEBER HOUSE!SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 4 - 7 PM1510 UNIVERSITY AVENUEFESTIVE FOOD & DRINK2018 RIVERSIDE COLLECTORS EDITION ORNAMENTS FOR SALETOURS OF THE HISTORIC WEBER HOUSECRAFTS FOR ALL AGESACCEPTING DONATIONS OF UNWRAPPED TOYS& GIFT CARDS TO BENEFIT LOCAL CHARITIES

Published
Victoria Avenue Forever

Ruth West

Posted by:

ACTION ALERT FROM VICTORIA AVENUE FOREVER: Proposed Traffic Roundabouts Threaten Victoria Avenue’s Historic Landscape Victoria Avenue currently faces the greatest threat to its historic integrity since it was created in 1892. The Department of Public Works will present a report to the Transportation Committee on November 8 at 1:00 pm in the City Council Chambers in which they will recommend construction of traffic circles, or roundabouts, on Victoria Avenue at Washington and other intersections. What you need to know: Victoria Avenue is a historic divided scenic parkway that traverses the greenbelt. Originally commissioned in 1892, it has become a popular tourist attraction and linear park because of the many trees and exotic plants used to landscape the route. The nine miles of preserved landscaping are characterized by a 30-foot-wide median planted with flowering trees lined by over 100-year-old Mexican Fan Palms and Ragged Robin roses. The parkways possess tall evergreen trees, including California Fan Palms, Eucalyptus, and Pepper trees. The iconic views of Victoria Avenue include the tall fan palms with their “heads” all aligned in the sky as far as you can see. Since 1992, Victoria Avenue Forever has taken over the planting of replacement trees with donations from local citizens in memory of loved ones, making them living memorials. Volunteers planted these 1600 trees and they belong to the community. Since the 1920s the citizens of Riverside have been protecting Victoria Avenue for the use and enjoyment of the generations to come. Victoria Avenue is Riverside Cultural Heritage Landmark #8 and was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 2000. These designations should guarantee protection of Victoria Avenue against such drastic changes. VAF’s concerns about the roundabout concept and design are enumerated here. 1. Preservation: The roundabouts would route cars right down the median, thus significantly changing the structure of Victoria Avenue and necessitating the removal of at least 14 Mexican Fan Palms and 12 mature flowering trees from EACH intersection. The report falsely claims that these “can be relocated” or “replaced in kind”. It is biologically impossible for 100+ year old palms and mature flowering trees to be transplanted or replaced “in kind.” Victoria Avenue is a unique scenic corridor through the City of Riverside. Experimentation with radical traffic engineering concepts should not occur in such historically sensitive locations. If traffic congestion is the concern, traffic signals would be better from a preservation standpoint because they would maintain the overall original landscape design of the Avenue and would result in the loss of fewer irreplaceable trees. 2. Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety: Victoria Avenue is a multiuse open space. It is on the City and County Trail maps because it has a dedicated pedestrian walkway and a memorial bicycle path. The traffic study focuses solely on motorist use and provides no data on the numbers or timing of walkers, joggers and cyclists. The accident report shows two accidents in which bicyclists were injured and one in which a pedestrian was injured even though the double stop on Washington is designed to protect them. A disadvantage of roundabouts is that it marginalizes pedestrians and cyclists, at best, or is dangerous for them, at worst. In the roundabout drawing, pedestrian walkways are placed at a distance from the roundabout proper. Two of them cut right through the median of Victoria Avenue necessitating the removal of more trees and landscaping. Despite the statement to the contrary in the report, crosswalks associated with roundabouts are note safer for pedestrians, especially children, elderly, wheelchair-bound and the visually impaired. Crossing the exit lane from the roundabout is particularly confusing and hazardous for walkers because drivers typically do not signal their exit. Therefore, it is impossible to determine which cars travelling within the roundabout will exit into the oncoming lane. When they do, there is limited time to make a safe crossing. VAF is particularly concerned about the right turn bypass lane (noted in red on the map) from Washington to Victoria Avenue, where pedestrians will have to cross three lanes of traffic in two places. Many traffic engineers recommend adding traffic signals to safeguard pedestrians. These would increase the costs of the project, slow traffic and further degrade the historic character of the Avenue. Traffic signals are a better alternative to roundabouts for pedestrians. VAF also contests the notion that roundabouts are safer for bicyclists. Avid, racing cyclists might feel bold enough to travel in the center of the roundabout lane and compete in speed and skill with vehicles, but most recreational cyclists, especially the young and elderly, would likely travel on the right of vehicles where they are vulnerable to being hit because “the motorists need only look to their left” and will not be aware of the bicycle on the right. The alternative, that cyclists travel in the pedestrian walkways, will discourage them from using the Avenue. In Europe, roundabouts are not used in city centers where there are many bicyclists and pedestrians. 3. Unequal Traffic: Roundabouts give preference to motorists traveling in the dominate direction of traffic. Since vehicles already in the roundabout have the right of way, those traveling in other directions are prevented from entering the roundabout and traffic in these directions backs up. The heavy traffic on Washington is mainly due to commuters. Thus, neighborhood residents, as well as pedestrians, joggers, and bicyclists, who are on Victoria will be disadvantaged. The roundabouts will therefore transfer delays for those outside the neighborhood to those inside the neighborhood. Traffic signals would provide a more equitable alternative. 4. Social Justice: Victoria Avenue runs through an economically disadvantaged community and provides open space to its residents. The pedestrians (walkers, joggers, parents pushing baby strollers, care providers pushing wheelchairs, etc.) and most of the bicyclists are local residents and whose children go to two schools (Washington Elementary and Gage Middle School) within a block of Victoria Avenue. We need to protect their use of the Avenue and not let it be curtailed by roundabouts that entitle motorists traveling through them. In summary, for all the above reasons roundabouts are the wrong choice for Victoria Avenue: They irreparably mar its historic character; reduce its recreational value; and place traffic burdens on local neighborhoods. A more global approach to reducing traffic, in accordance with Prop R and Measure C, should be explored first. As a last resort, traffic signals would more effectively (1) solve the traffic congestion problems (i.e. produce acceptable levels of service), (2) provide safety to pedestrians and cyclists, (3) distribute intersection delays more equitably, and (4) protect the historic nature of Victoria Avenue. What you can do to Help: a. Be Informed. Visit the City’s Website (https://riversideca.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx) Read the reports for the Transportation Committee Meeting on November 8. You can use “eComment” to provide your response. b. Attend the Transportation Committee Meeting on November 8, 1:00 PM The committee will meet in the City Council Chamber at City Hall. Obtain a speaker card and be prepared to share your opinion during public comments. c. Send an e-mail to the City Clerk (city_clerk@riversideca.gov) Your email will be entered into the public record of the meeting. d. Send an e-mail to your City Councilman prior to the meeting. e. Inform your friends, family, and other groups and encourage them to respond. Talking Points: 1. Roundabouts will destroy Victoria Avenue’s historic character and its trees. Victoria Avenue is one of the most iconic symbols of Riverside and should be preserved, along with its trees. 2. Roundabouts will endanger and displace walkers, joggers, bicyclists, and scenic drivers who use Victoria Avenue as a linear park. 3. Roundabouts will slow and burden local residents using the avenue to travel to their destinations. 4. Roundabouts do not belong in historically sensitive locations. On right—City’s Roundabout design for the Washington St. and Victoria Ave. intersection. NOTE—the approaches to the roundabout on Victoria Ave. meander right through the medians, requiring the removal of 14 tall Fan Palms and 12 flowering trees. www.victoriaavenueforever.org

Published
Old Riverside Foundation 2018 Vintage Home Tour

Ruth West

Posted by:

Tickets are no longer available to purchase but may at some of any of these locations. Please call with the location first to be sure they still have tickets to sell. Tickets for the twenty-seventh Vintage Home Tour may be purchased at the Weber House, as stated above. Tickets purchased online will be available for pickup at the Weber House, 1510 University Avenue, on the day of the tour. There is a map in the tour booklet that accompanies your tickets showing where all the houses are. If you purchased your tickets at one of the above vendors, you may pick up your tour booklet at any of the homes on the tour, or at the Weber House. The houses may be visited in any order, and you will be guided through the houses by docents who will give you information on the history of the house. For your convenience, here is a copy of this year’s map.

Published
RSVP to Old Riverside Foundation Awards Ceremony and Annual Meeting

Ruth West

Posted by:

RSVP here for our Awards Ceremony and Annual Meeting on October 29, 2017

Published
Summer Speaker Series – Part Three

Ruth West

Posted by:

“Modern Brutalism: Form forever follows function… sometimes” The power, strength, and meaning of brutalist building forms is an influential message in the transition of time. That form of architecture can strongly survive, but sometimes the function of such things can culturally crumble. Please reserve your seats for the last session on Saturday, September 16, 2017, by emailing info@oldriverside.org, calling Old Riverside Foundation at (951) 683-2725, or RSVP online here. Saturday, September 16, 2017 “Strange and Surreal: The Frenzy of Architectural Aesthetics”Architectural design swings both ways, sometimes further than expected. Such unique characters — the people involved and the buildings created — often have influence on how our community progresses and transform our paths to the future.Location: WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 5770 Arlington Avenue, Riverside, CA 92504, from 4:00 to 6:00. Light refreshments will be served.

Published
Carnegie Library Windows Donated to Riverside Public Library

Ruth West

Posted by:

We learned some encouraging news about the old Carnegie Library! It turns out that a number of windows were salvaged from the old library when it was demolished in 1964. Chadwick Barrie salvaged the windows with the help of his sons, and the windows were stored at the Barrie family home ever since. On July 24, 2017, the Board of Library Trustees accepted the donation of the windows to the Riverside Public Library. The Barrie family has made the donation with the hope that the windows will be incorporated into the new library. The Old Riverside Foundation applauds the Barrie Family for preserving a vital piece of Riverside’s architectural history and for their generous donation to the Riverside Public Library. We urge the Board of Library Trustees, the architectural firm Johnson Favaro, and the City of Riverside to honor the wishes of the Barrie Family and incorporate these beautiful windows into the design of the new library. Honoring the Carnegie Library, which remains dear to many in Riverside, in this manner may go a long way toward healing the wounds from its demolition. Read More Here: Carnegie Library Windows Donated to the Library (PDF) Photos Courtesy of Local History Office, Riverside Public Library/Riverside Municipal Museum

Published
Summer Speaker Series – Part Two

Ruth West

Posted by:

“Restoration or Radical Reconstruction: Ordinary, Symbolic, and Cultural Memory” What happens to architecture? Sometimes it’s torn down, or deteriorates, or restored, or radically reconstructed. All of this can be ordinary, but the most evocative part of any this is the important symbolic and cultural memory that affects and inspires us. Please reserve your seats for the next two sessions by emailing info@oldriverside.org, calling Old Riverside Foundation at (951) 683-2725, RSVP online here.

Published
Summer Speaker Series – Part One

Ruth West

Posted by:

Saturday, June 24, 2017: “Restoration or Radical Reconstruction: Ordinary, Symbolic, and Cultural Memory” What happens to architecture? Sometimes it’s torn down, or deteriorates, or restored, or radically reconstructed. All of this can be ordinary, but the most evocative part of any this is the important symbolic and cultural memory that affects and inspires us. Location: CENTER FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CIVIL LIBERTIES 3855 Market Street, Riverside, CA 92501, from 4:00 to 6:00.

Published
2017 Summer Speaker Series

Ruth West

Posted by:

The Old Riverside Foundation is pleased to offer a four-part series of educational -– and entertaining -– talks, “The Postwar Boom: Architecture Arrives.” The talks are FREE with the first taking place on Saturday June 24th. Ted Wells, a noted architect and architectural historian, is our guest speaker. Ted will put the postwar movements in architecture into context with the postwar political, economic, artistic and social atmosphere of the late 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s. Each of the venues chosen for the talks is relevant to the series and will help to illuminate the development of architecture and culture that is now considered historic -– and enlightening. Mark your calendars for the four lectures! “Restoration or Radical Reconstruction: Ordinary, Symbolic, and Cultural Memory” Click here to reserve your seats for one or all of the sessions, or email to info@oldriverside.org or call Old Riverside Foundation at (951) 683-2725. Old Riverside Foundation Announces a Free Summer Guest Speaker Series! The Old Riverside Foundation is pleased to offer a four-part series of educational – and entertaining – talks, “The Postwar Boom: Architecture Arrives”. Ted Wells, a noted architect and architectural historian, is our guest speaker (see more information about him at the end of this article). Ted will put the postwar movements in architecture into context with the postwar political, economic, artistic and social atmosphere of the late 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s. Each of the venues chosen for the talks is relevant to the series and will help to illuminate the development of architecture and culture that is now considered historic – and enlightening. Mark your calendars for the following lectures! Saturday, August 19, 2017: “Modern Brutalism: Form Forever Follows Function … Sometimes” The power, strength, and meaning of brutalist building forms is an influential message in the transition of time. That form of architecture can strongly survive, but sometimes the function of such things can culturally crumble. Location: MAIN RIVERSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Main Library Auditorium, 2nd Floor, 3581 Mission Inn Avenue, Riverside, CA 92501, from 4:00 to 6:00. Light refreshments will be served after the talk. Saturday, September 16, 2017 “Strange and Surreal: The Frenzy of Architectural Aesthetics” Architectural design swings both ways, sometimes further than expected. Such unique characters — the people involved and the buildings created — often have influence on how our community progresses and transform our paths to the future. Location: WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 5770 Arlington Avenue, Riverside, CA 92504, from 4:00 to 6:00. Light refreshments will be served. About Ted Wells In addition to architecture, he is an author, designer, historian, and curator of museum exhibitions and education programs. His latest books include Bohemian Bridges: California as a Superstructure for Social and Cultural Change; Bohemian Highways: Art & Culture Abide Then Divide Along the California Coast; Bohemian Crossroads: Art & Culture Collide Then Subside on the Monterey Peninsula; Casting Shadows: Auguste Rodin, all published by Guardian Stewardship Editions; Eva Zeisel: Life, Design, and Beauty, published by Chronicle Books. In 2017, Arcadia Publishing is releasing, Images of America: Laguna Niguel – a book on the history of the early master-planned community in the USA. Other upcoming books are Romantic Modern: The California Architecture of Harwell Hamilton Harris; Horizon Homes: Living a Concrete Dream. Wells presents lectures in the U.S. and internationally. He is the host of podcasts at iTunes and Public Radio Exchange: Simple Rediscovery, The Middle Edges, Ted Wells Living Simple Arts & Architecture, and more. Saturday, June 24, 2017: “Restoration or Radical Reconstruction: Ordinary, Symbolic, and Cultural Memory” What happens to architecture? Sometimes it’s torn down, or deteriorates, or restored, or radically reconstructed. All of this can be ordinary, but the most evocative part of any this is the important symbolic and cultural memory that affects and inspires us. Location: CENTER FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CIVIL LIBERTIES 3855 Market Street, Riverside, CA 92501, from 4:00 to 6:00. Saturday, July 22, 2017: “Unfamiliar Architecture: Create the New from the Damaged Old” Every day, architecture changes. It moves forward, backward… or stalls. The transformative veneer is a part of cultural history. And how that affects architecture, history, and our community is an important part of society. Something new can always emerge from something old. Location: ALL SAINTS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 3847 Terracina Drive, Riverside, CA 92506, from 4:00 to 6:00.

Published
Vintage Home Tour & Restoration Faire

Rush West

Posted by:

Vintage Home Tour & Restoration Faire Home Tour 2017: May 20, 2017 – 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.Contact: hometour@oldriverside.org Each year, Old Riverside Foundation features fine examples of the many styles of architecture prevalent in Riverside at the height of its prosperity. Different homes are open each year to give visitors a glimpse into the lives of Riversiders from different eras. The annual event is held in May on the Saturday following Mother’s Day. In addition to the opportunity to tour some of Riverside’s beautiful vintage homes, the Restoration Faire features a tour of the Old Riverside Foundation’s freshly restored headquarters — the Peter J. Weber House — and a host of booths featuring antiques, crafts, restoration services, and salvage items for your home and garden. 26th Annual Vintage Home Tour & Restoration FaireDate: Saturday, May 20, 2017 | Time: 10 a.m – 4 p.m.Tickets: $20 (pre-sale); (OR $22 on day of tour at the Weber House: 1510 University Avenue, Riverside) Tickets purchased online will be available for pickup on day of event at the Weber House: 1510 University Avenue, Riverside.Questions? Contact: hometour@oldriverside.org

Published
Annual Meeting 2016

Ruth West

Posted by:

Awards Presentation & Reception Awards 2016: October 16, 2016 (in conjunction with Annual Meeting)Location: Benedict Castle (5445 Chicago Avenue, Riverside)Time: 4 p.m.Contact: awards@oldriverside.org An afternoon event that showcases some of the year’s best public, commercial and private historic preservation projects in Riverside County. Every year, the Old Riverside Foundation honors painstaking restoration, diligent maintenance, and good adaptive reuse through its annual Awards Presentation & Reception. Be sure to check out photos from the event.

Published
Holidays at the Weber House

Dave Stolte

Posted by:

Holidays at

the Weber House

Saturday, December 14 from 4:00pm – 7:00pm

1510 University Avenue

BRING A FRIEND WHO’S NEVER VISITED!

FESTIVE FOOD & DRINK • HOUSE TOURS

COLLECTOR’S EDITION ORNAMENTS

CRAFTS FOR ALL AGES • OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

ACCEPTING DONATIONS OF UNWRAPPED TOYS

& GIFT CARDS TO BENEFIT LOCAL CHARITIES

Take a tour of the Weber House

Additional Resources

© 2018 Old Riverside Foundation | Created by : Go Channel Marketing